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Tairgwaith

Tairgwaith is a village nestled below the Gwyhryd Mountain just a mile from the heart of the Amman Valley.

The origin of the name, Tairgwaith is still a matter of debate. Some favour ‘the three works’ as the correct translation, referring to the area’s three collieries, while others prefer ‘the works’ houses’. More on this in “the History” section.

There are walks up onto the mountain, & footpaths with spectacular views of the Brecon Beacons and beyond.   The village, once a bustling coal mining community still has a busy open cast mine, further up the valley, with a working coal-rail link.

The Aman & Loughor Heritage Trail is a long-distance path with fine views running the length of the valley passing through the villages of Cwmllynfell, Brynaman, Tairgwaith, Gwaun Cae Gurwen, Garnant and Glanaman before reaching Betws and Ammanford.  Interpretation points along the way tell the story of this intriguing area and there are frequent opportunities to stop to enjoy the local countryside.

Within this small village lies a primary school, an IT Learning Centre & Nursery, Community Centre, a Workingmen’s Club, and a purpose-built harness-racing track so is thriving with activity.

The village of Tairgwaith some say has two meanings,

  1. Tairgwaith ; which means three works.
  2. Tair’gwaith; which means houses of the works.

In the past Tairgwaith had three mines: East Pit, Maerdy Pit and Steer Pit.

These mines have long finished but coal is still dug out in a large opencast were good welsh coal still lays beneath the ground.

Today the village of Tairgwaith has about 200 properties, a school, workman’s club, community centre, a learning centre and an all weather racing track for harness racing and motor bike events.

The Amman Valley trotting Club was built on the old grounds of the Meardy Pit which lies in the heart of the village. The club is run by volunteers and has been very successful. The racing is shown on television and it shows what a small village can do. The track also holds motor bike racing and has a daredevil stunt show at the track, many people attend from all over the UK, which is good news for a small village.

At one time in the village we had small shops, chip shop, post office and pub but like all things these are now closed and forgotten.

Tairgwaith primary school has over 100 children in attendance, the children come from other close villages, as its not fully welsh speaking school, but it grows stronger each year with the amount of children attending the school.